Designed for learning

learning – teaching – research – design – technology

moocs, patterns and bird formations

 

Inga has written a very nice (and short!) post, reflecting on Stephen Downes’ presentation at LSE yesterday.

I agree with much (most?) of what Stephen says, and I recommend this slidedeck to anyone interested in MOOCs. There are a few issues which raise some questions, so I thought I’d mention those. Stephen Downes refers to designpatterns and Diana Laurillard ‘s Learning Designer in slide  11. Diana had explored designpatterns in her book, and we did in ours. Together with Steven Warburton, I’m currently running a project on MOOC design patterns. The examples on slides 12 and 13 are close to proto-patterns.

I would take an issue with slide 30. Very interesting, and important argument – and very timely in relation to MOOCs. Bird formations are designed by evolution: not the actual pattern, which is dynamical, but the simple rules of behaviour which make it possible. There’s a great analogy to MOOCs, except that there we’re talking about artificial systems, and hence we have a responsibility to design them. Emergent behaviour will not emerge out of chaos, only out of carefully managed chaos.
As for slide 52, I have an issue with the analogy between neural networks and social networks. Neurons are governed by complex electro-chemical interactions, but have no autonomy. Humans in online social networks are governed by pathetically simplistic interaction mechanisms, but have autonomy. Both are complex, dynamic systems – but they are very, very different. Neural networks have evolved to be amazingly powerful pattern recognition machines. See Andy Clark’s work on brains and predictive coding. Online social networks are good at generating patterns, e.g. MEMEs, not necessarily at spotting them. This is the root cause of bubbles – whether market bubbles or filter bubbles.

July 10, 2014 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

CfP: Special issue of JIME – “Ideas in Mobile Learning”

The Journal of Interactive Media in Education (JIME) invites contributions for a Special Issue that expands on the trends explored in the successful ‘Bristol Ideas in Mobile Learning Symposium’ (see http://cloudworks.ac.uk/cloud/view/8540), which took place March 6-7, 2014. The Special Issue is due to be published in Spring 2015 and is open to Symposium participants and any interested researchers. Papers will be reviewed following the usual JIME pattern of a double blind review by two reviewers.

Requested contributions should offer any combination of conceptual, critical, design, empirical, theoretical or experimental work that addresses at least one of the following three trends of mobile learning state-of-the-art research:

  • New patterns of connected social learning and work-based practices
  • Learning Design for ‘mobile learning’ at scale
  • Exploring the new thresholds of learning enabled by mobile technologies.

Examples of key questions in these research trends are provided below (but should not restrict contributions). We expect the Special Issue to contain up to 6 full length reviewed articles and there may also be capacity for two short ‘position’ papers.

Deadline for the submission of papers: September 22nd 2014.

John Cook, Yishay Mor and Patricia Santos (as co-chairs of the Symposium) are the Guest Editors.

Correspondence: john2.cook@uwe.ac.uk

April 28, 2014 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

It’s out! Our edited book: Practical Design Patterns for Teaching and Learning with Technology

Book coverPractical Design Patterns for Teaching and Learning with Technology

Yishay Mor, Harvey Mellar, Steven Warburton and Niall Winters (Eds.)

“These are challenging times in which to be an educator. The constant flow of innovation offers new opportunities to support learners in an environment of ever-shifting demands. Educators work as they have always done: making the most of the resources at hand, and dealing with constraints, to provide experiences which foster growth. This was John Dewey’s ideal of education 80 years ago and it is still relevant today. This view sees education as a practice that achieves its goals through creative processes involving both craft and design. Craft is visible in the resources that educators produce and in their interactions with learners. Design, though, is tacit, and educators are often unaware of their own design practices. The rapid pace of change is shifting the balance from craft to design, requiring that educators’ design work become visible, shareable and malleable. The participatory patterns workshop is a method for doing this through engaging practitioners in collaborative reflection leading to the production of structured representations of design knowledge. The editors have led many such workshops and this book is a record of that endeavour and its outcomes in the form of practical design narratives, patterns and scenarios that can be used to address challenges in teaching and learning with technology.”

 

 

 

ISBN Paperback: 9789462095281 ($ 54.00)
ISBN Hardcover: 9789462095298 ($ 99.00)

Subject: Educational Technology

Number 8 of the series: Technology Enhanced Learning

pdfFree Preview Practical Design Patterns for Teaching and Learning with Technology

April 4, 2014 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Talk next Wednesday: Design inquiry of learning, the learning design studio, and a vision for future learning and teaching environments

I’m giving a talk next week at the University of Haifa. I’ll try to set up a google hangout on air, but the talk will be in Hebrew (and google translate doesn’t do audio as far as I know).

Synopsis:

Teacher training and professional development programs aim to provide practitioners with a structured basis of knowledge in psychology, pedagogy and subject matter, which they will apply in their educational work. However, research suggests that practitioners often fail to connect the abstract knowledge they acquire to the
concrete situations in which they work. Consequently, they are left frustrated with the offerings of educational science, and eventually abandon them in favour of what they perceive as good craft.

Two emerging approaches try to address this dissonance: Teacher Inquiry and Teachers as Learning Designers. The first applies Dewey’s ideals of inquiry learning to teachers’ professional development, the second follows the constructionist pedagogy of learning by design, resonating the ideals of Simon, Schon and Papert.

The Design Inquiry of Learning (DIL) combines these approaches, by modelling teacher inquiry after the practices and principles of educational design research. Learners follow a cycle of (1) defining their project, (2) investigating the context in which it is situated and identifying appropriate technopedagogical theories, (3) reviewing relevant cases, (4) conceptualizing a solution, (5) implementing a prototype of that solution, (6) evaluating it and (7) reflecting on the process. The Learning Design Studio is an implementation of the abstract DIL model which draws on the studio tradition in design education.

This talk will present the design inquiry of learning model, and the learning design studio format and review initial empirical results from their application. I will conclude with some theoretical observations and consider a possible vision of future classrooms as a design laboratories of learning.

Teacher training and professional development programs aim to provide practitioners with a structured basis of knowledge in psychology, pedagogy and subject matter, which they will apply in their educational work. However, research suggests that practitioners often fail to connect the abstract knowledge they acquire to the concrete situations in which they work. Consequently, they are left frustrated with the offerings of educational science, and eventually abandon them in favour of what they perceive as good craft. Two emerging approaches try to address this dissonance: Teacher Inquiry and Teachers as Learning Designers. The first applies Dewey's ideals of inquiry learning to teachers' professional development, the second follows the constructionist pedagogy of learning by design, resonating the ideals of Simon, Schon and Papert. The Design Inquiry of Learning (DIL) combines these approaches, by modelling teacher inquiry after the practices and principles of educational design research. Learners follow a cycle of (1) defining their project, (2) investigating the context in which it is situated and identifying appropriate technopedagogical theories, (3) reviewing relevant cases, (4) conceptualizing a solution, (5) implementing a prototype of that solution, (6) evaluating it and (7) reflecting on the process. The Learning Design Studio is an implementation of the abstract DIL model which draws on the studio tradition in design education. This talk will present the design inquiry of learning model, and the learning design studio format and review initial empirical results from their application. I will conclude with some theoretical observations and consider a possible vision of future classrooms as a design laboratories of learning.

Talk Flyer – Design inquiry of learning, the learning design studio,
and a vision for future learning and teaching environments (25 Dec. 2013, University of Haifa)

December 19, 2013 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Resource cloud for MobiLearnFest

We are organising a “Mobile Learning Festival” (MobilLearnFest) as part of the “Ideas in Mobile Learning Symposium” (6th – 7th March 2014, Watershed, Bristol UK; submission deadline: January 5th 2014).

The MobiLearnFest will be an experimental, interactive, hands-on, open session which aims to give participants an opportunity to experience the ideas discussed at the Symposium and engage the general public in our conversation: http://cloudworks.ac.uk/cloud/view/8507

If you’re considering a submission for the MobiLearnFest, you might have a demo or activity already planned – which is fine, or you might want to offer a mobile learning experience which related to the local environment. In this case, we have prepared a resource cloud to help you prepare your submission: http://cloudworks.ac.uk/cloud/view/8519
Parts of this cloud are open for crowdsourcing (an editable map, a wiki, a social bookmarking site), so if you happen to have any relevant knowledge – we would appreciate your contribution!

December 12, 2013 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Call for contributions: Ideas in Mobile Learning Symposium and mobiLearnFest, Bristol, 6th – 7th March 2014

John Cook has kindly invited me to co-chair the Ideas in Mobile Learning Symposium in Bristol. We thought we want a “proper” academic event, but also want to have some fun and challenge some practices. For example, do you also feel slightly amused when someone stands on a pulpit and shows a powerpoint about mobile collaborative learning? So we thought we’ll include a “mobiLearnFest” element in the event, which will take the symposium out to the streets. To make it even more interesting, we’re experimenting with an open review model for this element of the symposium.

Deadline is Jan. 5th, for a 1000 word abstract.

Oh, and John has also promised (threatened?) to play a live punk rock gig!

http://cloudworks.ac.uk/cloud/view/8498

The Ideas in Mobile Learning symposium invites papers around the broad themes of ‘innovation, creativity and sustainability’ for mobile learning. However, we have a strong preference that papers address at least one of the following three trends of mobile learning state-of-the-art research (click here for details):

  • Focus on new patterns of connected social learning and work-based practices.
  • Focus on designing for ‘mobile learning’ at scale.
  • Focus on the boundaries of learning that the ‘m’ in m-learning forces us to explore.

The symposium is a research off-shoot of the successful workshop ‘Towards sustainable mobile learning scenarios’ held in Bristol 9th-10th October, 2013. Requested contributions should offer any combination of conceptual, critical, design, empirical, theoretical or experimental work that relates in some way to the symposium’s broad themes and/or the three trends. Places are limited to 40 participants in order to enable a single track event where engaging, interdisciplinary conversational threads will be centre stage.

http://cloudworks.ac.uk/cloud/view/8507

mobiLearnFest is part of the “Ideas in Mobile Learning Symposium, 6th – 7th March 2014, Watershed, Bristol UK. It is an experimental, interactive, hands-on, open session which aims to give participants an opportunity to experience the ideas discussed at the Symposium and engage the general public in our conversation.

mobiLearnFest will showcase a selected number of mobile learning innovations and studies. Submission and selection of these works is completely open – see details below.

mobiLearnFest consists of three phases:

  • Demo sprint selected teams will have 150 seconds to present their work to the Symposium.
  • Mobile experiences each team will provide a mobile learning experience in the surrounding area, which would offer Symposium participants as well as the general public the oppurtunity to engage with their technology, ideas or research findings.
  • Collaborative reflection Symposium participants will reconvene to share their experiences, and consider emerging themes and questions.

November 6, 2013 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

CfP: BJET special issue on Learning Analytics, Learning Design and Teacher Inquiry (Deadline: 7 Oct)

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/store/10.1111/(ISSN)1467-8535/asset/homepages/Teacher-led_enquiry_call_for_papers__updated___2_.pdf?v=1&s=f77fb8ad51f9538144f7f31d131945f31f90b852
Teacher-led inquiry, learning design and learning analytics:  a virtuous circle
Guest editors: Dr Yishay Mor, Dr Rebecca Ferguson and Professor Barbara Wasson
This special issue, BJET Volume 46, Issue 1, will be published in January 2015. This issue seeks to explore the synergy between teacher-led inquiry into student learning (TISL), learning design, and learning analytics.  For learning design to be effective, it should be informed and evaluated by teacher inquiry or should form part of a process of inquiry. For TISL to be meaningful, it should support the design of activities and resources. Together, these suggest an integrated dynamic model of teaching as design inquiry of learning. The recent emergence of learning analytics as a field offers to equip learners and teachers with powerful new tools that can support their inquiry into learning practices.

September 18, 2013 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Innovating Pedagogy report II is out

The OU’s Innovating Pedagogy reports explore new forms of teaching, learning and assessment, to guide educators and policy makers. The 2013 report updates four previous areas of innovation and introduces six new ones: Crowd Learning, Learning from Gaming, Maker Culture, Geo-Learning, Digital Scholarship and Citizen Inquiry. The report can be downloaded from http://www.open.ac.uk/innovating.

September 8, 2013 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Call for Submissions – MOOCs and Beyond: eLearning Papers Issue 33

http://elearningeuropa.info/en/news/call-submissions-moocs-and-beyond-elearning-papers-issue-33

eLearning Papers is currently welcoming submissions which address the challenges and future of Massive Open Online Courses, a trend in education that has skyrocketed since 2008. Issue 33, MOOCs and Beyond, seeks to both generate debate, and coalesce a variety of critical perspectives into a fruitful body of research.

Educators today are confronted with several questions regarding MOOCs. These include:What role do they play in the undergraduate degree system? In particular, what threat do they pose to higher education as it currently operates? Also, what does the path towards proper accreditation for these classes look like?

On a broader level, MOOCs offer another site from which to explore the intersection between technology and pedagogy, in the effort to improve our understanding of how to support learning. How do MOOCs differ from face-to-face, or even on-line closed courses? What is particular about the MOOC learning experience, and what does that teach us?

Contributors are invited to present theoretical or empirical research, specifically regarding the following topics:

- Experiences speaking to the design, implementation or assessment of a MOOC.

The impact of MOOCs within Higher Education.

Learning analytics and MOOCs.

Peer-to-peer learning and MOOCs.

- Analyses of the impact and reach of MOOCs – considering course completion, global recognition.

The guest editor for this edition is Yishay Mor.

Deadline: March 25th, 2013.

Click here to read the complete Call for Papers.

March 9, 2013 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

My Phd, made practical: “SNaP! Re-using, sharing and communicating designs and design knowledge using scenarios, narratives and patterns”

Mor, Yishay (2013). SNaP! Re-using, sharing and communicating designs and design knowledge using scenarios, narratives and patterns. In: Luckin, Rose; Goodyear, Peter; Grabowski, Barbara and Winters, Niall eds. Handbook of Design in Educational Technology. London: Routledge, (In press).

http://oro.open.ac.uk/33861/

In order to enable a culture of critical, informed and reflective design practice we need a linguistic framework for communicating design knowledge: the knowledge of the characteristic features of a domain of practice, the challenges which inhabit it, and the established methods of resolving them. Such an infrastructure must “serve two masters”; on one hand, it should adhere to the requirements of scientific rigor, ensuring that the proposed conditions and challenges are genuine and the solutions effective. On the other hand, it should maintain pragmatic adequacy, ensuring that the insights it encapsulates are readily available for practitioners to implement in real-world situations. Several representations have been proposed to this effect: design narratives (Mor, 2011; Barab et al, 2008; Bell, Hoadley and Linn, 2004; Hoadley, 2002; Linn & Hsi, 2000), design principles (Kali, 2006, 2008; Linn, Bell, & Davis, 2004; Merrill, 2002; Quintana et al., 2004; van den Akker, 1999), and design patterns (Derntl & Motschnig-Pitrik, 2005; Goodyear, 2005; Mor & Winters, 2007; Retalis et al, 2006), to name a few. The aim of this chapter is to characterise two of these forms – design narratives and design patterns, and propose a third form – design scenarios, and suggest how these could be embedded in a cycle of reflective learning design.

 

November 28, 2012 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , | Leave a comment

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