Designed for learning

learning – teaching – research – design – technology

“A story of pattern mining in the field of interactive graphics”, Christian Kohls at the Knowledge Lab next Tuesday

A bit of a short notice, I know. But if you happen to be in town, come to Christian Kohl’s talk at the Knowledge lab:

Getting to sound educational settings, successful teaching methods and beneficial instructional tools and materials is a challenging design task. To not reinvent the wheel and learn by good practices that have proven in the past, patterns are a promising approach to capture the knowledge of experts. Design patterns describe the essential elements of solutions for recurrent problems and reason about context, applicability, benefits and liabilities. In this presentation, patterns of interactive information graphics will be demonstrated to show how various visual interaction forms can help or fail to serve in an instructional context. Based on these and other pedagogical patterns some fundamental concepts of patterns will be illustrated.

Starting with an elaboration of common practices of the pattern community to find, write and reflect about patterns, a model of pattern acquisition will be developed. This model is based on schema theory and leads to a discussion about the reliability and usability of patterns. The striking question is whether the documented patterns, the patterns in our mind and the patterns in the world are the same.

About the speaker
Christian Kohls is a Member of the research unit “Design and Implementation of Integrative Learning Environments”. He has been working at the Knowledge Media Research Center since 2005. His job is the technical development of the German information and qualification portal e-teaching.org. He is also responsible for editoring the content section “media technology” and gives frequently online trainings in e-learning software. After his studies of media and computer science he worked in the e-learning team of the University of Applied Sciences Wedel/Hamburg. He worked as consultant at pharus53 software solutions and implemented multilingual wbt solutions and software tutorials. He is inventor and development coordinator of moowinx, an end user tool to create interactive graphics.

October 23, 2008 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , | 1 Comment

by far, the best summary of #hhl08


says it all. (ht James Clay)

October 17, 2008 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , | Leave a comment

danah boyd at #hhl08. listen to her, she’s good.


(ht eyebeams)

October 17, 2008 Posted by | Uncategorized | , | Leave a comment

6 things I learned form Adele Botha


Adele Botha

Originally uploaded by stevewheeler7

  1. mobile coverage in inner city areas in south africa, Jamaica and other developing areas: %100
  2. out of the kids surveyed, %70 had used mobile internet in the last day
  3. even texting is expensive, but people workaround it using pleascallmes
  4. kids are creating de-facto p2p networks over bluetooth, with the same sharing etiquette of web p2p nets.
  5. kids figure out the technology, but need help coping with the culture shock
  6. there are known trees where, if you climb up a particular branch, you can get reception. people go up, send & receive batches of SMSs, and walk on. (is there a collaborative map of these?)

(more hhl coverage on Steve Wheeler’s blog)

October 17, 2008 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

my #hhl slidedeck

Abstract:

15 years ago, few learners had either mobile telephony or internet access as a reliable learning resource. Today most have both, in one 150gr device in their back pocket. The accelerated progress of technology means not just that learning is changing, but that change is changing. We – learners, teachers, researchers – have to respond to developments at a dizzying pace.

The first consequence we need to acknowledge is that the division of roles is being blurred. Teachers need to invest in continuous learning, learners can often take the role of teaching, and all are de-facto researchers: exploring and experimenting with new opportunities daily.

The second, more complex and perhaps more vital recognition is that we are all learning designers. We design learning environment for ourselves and for others by choosing the tools and their configuration, we design our curriculum, choosing which new skills and practices to acquire – and which to defer. We design learning experiences by carefully assembling tasks, tools, activities and social interactions.

These observations call for a renewed attention to learning as a design science. Herbert Simon defined: “everyone designs who devises courses of action aimed at changing existing situations into desired ones” (Simon, 1969, p 129). Hence, design science is, in a nutshell, the science of making a better world. Design science needs a language of its own. A set of “scientific instruments”, modes of capturing and sharing knowledge, and methods of establishing validity. Mor & Winters argue that design patterns and pattern languages hold a promise in this respect, and propose a workshop model for participatory development of pattern languages in education (Mor & Winters, 2007; 2008).

The Pattern Language Network project is developing a methodology, and a set of on-line tools to support it, for pattern-based design research in education. These are being used by communities of practitioners, developers and researchers to capture and share their expertise and examples of good practice as reusable design knowledge.

October 17, 2008 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The African origins of the Von-Neuman computer

I’m a long time fan of Ron Eglash’s work. So when I tuned into TED talks last night, and saw him on the side bar, I immediately switched over. And man was it worth it.

Geometric algorithms

October 6, 2008 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , | Leave a comment

born to game?

Does gaming improve cognitive performance, or are we attracted to games which match our innate abilities? Or maybe a bit of both, plus years of practice? Is there a difference between native gamers and gamers as a second language?

Video game players outperform non-players on measures of basic attention and performance. Differences might result from exposure to video games or reflect other group differences. Research has suggested a causal link between video game experience and improved attentional skills (e.g., Green & Bavelier, 2003). We sought to replicate and extend these results. Expert/non-gamer performance was assessed on tasks tapping a wide range of abilities. Non-gamers played 20+ hours of an action video game, a puzzle game, or a real-time strategy game. Expert gamers and non-gamers differed on a number of basic cognitive skills: experts could track objects moving at greater speeds, better detected changes to objects stored in visual short-term memory, switched more quickly between tasks, and mentally rotated objects more efficiently. Strikingly, extensive video game practice did not substantially enhance performance for non-gamers on most cognitive tasks (except for a mental rotation task). Our results suggest that at least some differences between video game experts and non-gamers in basic cognitive performance result either from far more extensive video game experience or from pre-existing group differences in abilities that result in a self-selection effect.

Boot, W. R., Kramer, A. F., Simons, D. J., Fabiani, M., Gratton, G. (in press).  The effects of video game playing on attention, memory, and executive control.  Acta Psychologica.

October 1, 2008 Posted by | Uncategorized | | Leave a comment

   

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